Wild Harvest Initiative

The Wild Harvest Initiative is the first attempt to systematically quantify wild protein harvest on such a large scale and seeks to change the narrative surrounding the importance of modern hunting and fishing. Wild protein harvest is one of the most healthy and ecologically sustainable methods of food procurement, and is an integral part our diet, culture and economy.

This initiative brings together a powerful group of sustainable use supporters. Conservation Visions Inc. is a private conservation organization focused on building boarder coalitions in support of biodiversity and sustainable use.

Species involved: All harvested for protein in the U.S. and Canada

Project partner: Conservation Visions, Inc.

Total SCIF Investment: $85,000 (With help from HLF)(Additional need: $50,000)

Year SCIF began involvement: 2016 (Timeline: 2012-Ongoing)

 

Project Objectives

1) Quantify the amount of wild protein procured by hunters and anglers each year in the U.S. and Canada.

2) Determine the nutritional, financial, ecological, and social benefits of wild protein procurement relative to modern agriculture.

3) Contribute to public awareness and support for sustainable wild protein harvest.

4) Provide numerical evidence as to why recreational hunting and angling traditions are relevant today.

 

Anticipated Outcomes

The purpose of this project is to demonstrate that hunting and angling not only provide an enormous financial benefit to society, they also provide substantial animal protein that otherwise must be provided through means that are financially and environmentally more costly. This project will also contribute to public awareness and support for sustainable wild protein harvest. The cultural and social importance of recreational hunting will be reinforced by this project by insuring the initiative stays as current and relevant as possible.

 

Recent Project Update 

The most recent quarterly update from Conservation Visions includes a species profile on feral pigs as a component of wild protein harvest in North America. Perhaps surprisingly, feral pigs rank second only to white‐tailed deer in terms of total contributions to nutrition from wild sources according to their estimates, and there is reason to think the current numbers are underestimated (e.g., many states do not consider pigs wildlife and do not track harvest). The project announced a partnership with the Johnny Morris Foundation/Bass Pro Shops. They are working on refining their quality assurance information for hunting data, as well as examining economic models to estimate the dollar value of wild‐harvested protein.